Recipes

Pork is a common source of protein in Okinawa and this rafute, a traditional Okinawan braised pork belly dish, showcases local island flavors. Pork is slow-cooked in awamori (local Okinawan distilled liquor) and kokuto (island black sugar) until the meat is tender, juicy and flavorful.
There’s nothing more comforting than a hot bowl of ramen. This easy to make recipe uses the power of soda bushi dashi to create a rich, umami-filled soup.
Soda bushi dashi enhances the flavors of fish while creating a delicious yet simple soup base.
Soda bushi dashi adds umami and subtle flavors from the sea to this simple and healthy tomato soup.
Ishiri adds a depth of umami and flavors from the sea to traditional ginger pork cooked in sesame oil.
This light and refreshing dish can be served as a side dish or salad and has a unique combination of flavors from the mentaiko nametake, nutty sesame oil, minty shiso and ginger. 

Simmered tofu is the perfect subtle base for the rich flavors of mentaiko nametake.

If you have never cooked with shio koji before, this simple pasta recipe is a tasty way to get acquainted with using this unique ingredient! 

Shio is the Japanese word for “salt”, while koji is a specific strain of mold that is used to ferment cooked rice. While it might sound odd to purposely cook with mold, koji has been a staple in Japanese cuisine for centuries. In fact, it is the foundation of several popular condiments including miso, soy sauce, rice vinegar, and sake. Rich in protease and enzymes, koji breaks down ingredients to highlight their natural flavors.

Shio koji is extremely versatile and can be used as a salt substitute, pickling agent, base for dressings/sauces, and marinade for meat and fish. In this recipe, shio koji is used in place of salt to enhance the sweetness of the tomatoes. 

We make a basic red sauce by cooking down minced garlic and chopped tomatoes, which is then flavored with shio koji and mirin (rice wine). Shio koji adds saltiness and umami, while mirin adds sweetness. Taste as you cook and add more or less of both condiments according to preference! If your tomatoes are not as ripe, try adding more mirin to sweeten the sauce. 

This recipe is extremely versatile and serves as a good base for additional ingredients. We recommend chicken, broccoli, and asparagus, but feel free to choose any proteins or vegetables that you like! Garnish with cheese, basil, and black pepper and serve piping hot.

Yakiniku, which literally means "grilled meat", is a type of Japanese BBQ. In this recipe, we're marinating boiled eggs in our Spicy Yakiniku sauce, which combines the natural sweetness from sauteed onions, fresh apples, and honey with the salty, umami flavor of pure brewed soy sauce. It's a quick and delicious snack and you can use any of the remaining sauce as a dip for grilled meat/veggies or in a stir fry!

Sweet and savory, this open-faced sandwich is a satisfying snack or light meal that’s full of floral flavor and ginger spice. 
This onion and ginger snack is the perfect treat to enjoy as you picnic under the springtime trees in Japan.
The delicate floral flavors of sakura make for a versatile sauce that can be used for vegetables, meat or fish.

Oden, the ultimate Japanese winter comfort food, is a classic nabemono (one-pot dish) with a variety of Japanese ingredients simmered in a light soy sauce based dashi (broth). You can try our traditional version if you have access to these Japanese ingredients or our western version with more commonly found ingredients. You can also get creative and use any local, seasonal ingredients you have available!

Oden, the ultimate Japanese winter comfort food, is a classic nabemono (one-pot dish) with a variety of Japanese ingredients simmered in a light soy sauce based dashi (broth). You can try our traditional version if you have access to these Japanese ingredients or our western version with more commonly found ingredients. You can also get creative and use any local, seasonal ingredients you have available!

The simple combination of butter, soy sauce and fresh tuna allows for the natural sweet, umami flavors of the sweet soy sauce to shine. This is also a great recipe for when you have leftover sashimi.
Tsukune are juicy, succulent chicken meatballs coated with a sweet and savory sauce and often served on skewers. They’re commonly enjoyed in izakayas alongside a dry beer, shochu or rose wine.
Nimono means “simmered dish” in Japanese, with ingredients being simmered in an ummai rich broth to absorb and enhance all the delicious flavors of the seasonal ingredients. This simple nimono uses oden soup as a base with daikon, eggs and chicken, but feel free to get creative and use any seasonal ingredients you have available!
Kasuzuke is a classic Japanese dish where fish/meat are marinated in a sake kasu (sake lees) marinade called kasudoko, then grilled/baked to perfection. The resulting flavors are full of rich umami with a slightly sweet, charcoal taste.

This hearty comfort food is the perfect way to stay warm in the winter. Kasujiru is a traditional Japanese soup which consists of a variety of ingredients such as carrots, daikon (Japanese radish), and/or fish, served in a sake kasu (sake lees) and miso broth. Feel free to use any seasonal vegetables you have available.

 

There’s nothing more comforting than a hot bowl of noodles. A specialty dish from Nagasaki, different regions in Japan also have their own local variations of chanpon noodles, which consists of a hot, fragrant broth served with unique noodles, a variety of meat/seafood and vegetables. In Japan, slurping loudly while enjoying noodles, a sound known as “zuru zuru”, is encouraged to enhance the aroma and flavor of the dish while paying compliments to the chef!

Osuimono is a clear soup that may appear simple but allows you to truly taste the natural flavors of its ingredients. Adding just a pinch of salt and soy sauce helps to draw out the umami from the sakebushi, creating a restaurant quality soup full of rich, deep flavor. 

Tsukemono (pickled vegetables) are a staple in almost every Japanese meal. Here tsukemono are combined with the rich flavors and sticky texture of Nebaneba Wasabi Konbu to create a delicious topping for rice, as a spread on bread/crackers or as a side dish. 
Not only is Japan famous for its traditional cuisine, it’s also known for transforming Western dishes using local ingredients. Soy sauce adds the perfect touch of umami to the butter and garlic sauce in this Japanese-style pasta.

Search our shop